How to unpack a standard

From OpenContent Curriculum

Jump to: navigation, search

Contents

Overview

This section addresses the following:

What does "unpack" a standard mean?

Unpacking a standard is the process of identifying what students will know and be able to do when they have mastered the standard. Ciritical elements to the success of the unpacking process; identifying reliable resources for determining depth and rigor, scaffolding skills with level above and below, Using clear and concise language for students

Why Is It Important to Unpack Standards?

Unpacking standards provides teachers and students an oportunity to ...

What do you do when you come across a standard that you feel is too general or not sure what it means?

Where can I go to find out?

What are reliable Resources?

Example: SS 5.17 Understands the impact of European exploration on Native African and Native American peoples.

What does unpack mean?

Dissecting a Standard

Dissecting Standard Example Processes

What vocabulary would students identify as unfamiliar? Can they define those terms and identify synonyms? identify- recognize, name, discover, see, spot, find variables- things that can change, unknowns influence- effect, impact, change, manipulate outcome- result, product, ending, conclusion

SC 4.4 Find things that can change the result of an experiment. SC 3/4.5 Reproduction and heredity National Science Education Standard Life Science Content Standard C: All students should develop an understanding of: *The characteristics of organisms *Life cycles of organisms *Organisms and environment

SC 3/4.5 Reproduction and heredity National Science Education Standard

Using Essential Questions with Standards

Essential Questions Examples SS 3.10 Recognizes leadership positions in the city, state, and nation (mayor/chief, governor, president) SS 4.6 Notes cause and effect relationships SS 3.1

Formulates questions to focus inquiry and analysis

SS 4.8 Recognizes and understands an increasing number of social science terms SS 3.10 Recognizes leadership positions in the city, state, and nation (mayor/chief, governor, president)

Can the students describe the three most important responsibilities of the mayor, governor, and president? Can the students identify the person who is currently acting as mayor, governor, and president? Can the students describe how a person is chosen to be mayor, governor, and president? Do the students know how long a person can be mayor, governor, and president?



SS 4.6 Notes cause and effect relationships


SS 3.1 Formulates questions to focus inquiry and analysis

SS 4.8 Recognizes and understands an increasing number of social science terms

Determining the Rigor or Depth of a Standard

SCIENCE http://www.nap.edu/books/0309053269/html/http:// www.project2061.org/default_flash.htm SOCIAL STUDIES Civics http://www.civiced.org/stds.html Economics http://www.ncee.net/ea/program.php?pid=19 Geography http://www.nationalgeographic.com/xpeditions/standards/matrix.html Social Studies Standards http://www.ncss.org/standards/ - Can't be viewed online but you can order a book here. US History and World History standard links http://w3.iac.net/~pfilio/hstst.htm National History Standards http://www.sscnet.ucla.edu/nchs/standards MATHEMATICS http://standards.nctm.org/ READING AND WRITING http://www.ncte.org/standards/standards.shtml

TEXTBOOKS

Determining the Rigor or Depth of a Standard (Example) SS 5.18 Compares and contrasts Native American and European cultural, economic, and political systems.

Standard 1D The student understands the differences and similarities among Africans, Europeans, and Native Americans who converged in the western hemisphere after 1492. Grade Level 5-12 Therefore, the student is able to 5-12 Compare political systems, including concepts of political authority, civic values, and the organization and practice of government. [Compare and contrast different political systems] 5-12 Compare social organizations, including population levels, urbanization, family structure, and modes of communication. [Compare and contrast different social organizations] 5-12 Compare economic systems, including systems of labor, trade, concepts of property, and exploitation of natural resources. [Compare and contrast different economic institutions] 5-12 Compare dominant ideas and values including religious belief and practice, gender roles, and attitudes toward nature. [Compare and contrast the influence of ideas]

Determining the Rigor or Depth of a Standard (Example)

SS 5.17 Understands the impact of European exploration on Native African and Native American peoples.

Standard 2A The student understands the stages of European oceanic and overland exploration, amid international rivalries, from the 9th to 17th centuries. Grade Level Therefore, the student is able to 5-12 Trace routes taken by early explorers, from the 15th through the 17th century, around Africa, to the Americas, and across the Pacific. [Draw upon data in historical maps] 7-12 Evaluate the significance of Columbus' voyages and his interactions with indigenous peoples. [Assess the importance of the individual in history] 5-12 Compare English, French, and Dutch motives for exploration with those of the Spanish. [Compare and contrast different sets of ideas] 9-12 Appraise the role of national and religious rivalries in the age of exploration and evaluate their long-range consequences. [Consider multiple perspectives] 7-12 Evaluate the course and consequences of the "Columbian Exchange." [Hypothesize the influence of the past] Determining the Rigor or Depth of a Standard (Textbook Example) SS 5.17 Understands the impact of European exploration on Native African and Native American peoples.

Silver-Burdett Our Country 1993

Chapter 3: The First Americans • Learning About the First Americans • The Indians of North Americans • The Indians of Middle and South America

Chapter 4: Europeans Come to America • Viking Explores • The Lure of Asia • Christopher Columbus Makes a Great Voyage

Chapter 5: Spanish Exploration and Conquest • Spain Takes the Lead • Pizarro and the Incas

Chapter 6: European Settlements in North America • England Turns to the New World • The Pilgrims in Plymouth Colony

Determining what Proficiency Looks Like  Level  Summary  Keywords  Identify standards  Task description (general)  Tasks (specific)  Tasks Assessment (effective scoring guides)..pg. 179  Make a scoring guide


Task (General) Students will work in groups to design a campaign for an individual running for the mayor of their village, governor of Alaska, or President of the United States. They will either make a campaign for an existing official or invent a fictitious official to run against the current official. They will identify their party affiliation, include present day issues and identify party-line stances on such issues, and also identify what effects their successful election or re-election may have on the community, state, or nation. Task #1 Students will choose an election party and find three current issues from either the local, state, or national level. The students must investigate their party-line stance and explain their position on each issue. Scoring Guide Task #1 Prior Knowledge  What prior knowledge or skills would the students need in order to participate in developing an activity or participating in an activity designed by the teacher?  How do you determine prior knowledge?  What are some possible extension activities or potential ties to other content areas? Role of the Content Area Standing Committees  Define depth and rigor of standards  Revise existing standards  Revise existing end-of-level assessments  Add or omit content standards

Personal tools
Namespaces
Variants
Actions
Wiki Navigation
BSSD Websites
About BSSD
BSSD Projects
Toolbox